Friday, 30 April 2010

Update


There are many of you good fellows out there for whom painting 28mm figures is a dawdle, and you will have your figure painting techniques honed to perfection, and I have visited many blogs, looking at galleries of photos, drooling with admiration and wishing that I could be as talented.


In the past I have painted 15mm Napoleonics and some of my own home made 25mm Jacobite Rebellion figures, but that was when I wore a younger mans clothes and had 20-20 vision. Perhaps that is what ruined my eyesight, sitting up into the wee small hours, painting away until I had double vision. My wife at the time, who was a nurse, did warn me that I was doing my eyes no good.


Anyway, I acquired 24 Aventine Allied Hastati figures, my interest in ancients having been fired up by Simon AKA Bigredbat, and I determined to paint them to, at least, an acceptable standard, doing only six at a time.


I know that many start with a black undercoat, but I used white. It had been my intention to use oil paint, but it must be tucked away in a box in the "glory hole", and there is no way I am going in there, so I have used acrylics, the artists variety, which I always to hand.


My Sequence of tackling the figures was, flesh tones, tunics, helmets and armour, then everything else. I then gave the tunics a very thin wash with black and did all the dry brushing after that.


I have posted a photo of the six being taken in rear by a WW2 commando who arrived through a wormhole from another time. Shields next then the basing.


6 comments:

  1. Hi John, looking good. More recruits for Zama are always welcome.

    Paul

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  2. Hi John, only just saw these; looking good (but we need a bigger photo!).

    Simon

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  3. Cheapo camera Simon. Can`t get too close or I get a blurry photo. When I complete them I`ll experiment with the zoom.

    John

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  4. Simon, have you clicked on the pic twice?
    John

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  5. Nice work john they are looking really good.

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  6. Thanks Kiwi. A big iluminated magnifying glass helps.

    ReplyDelete